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Posts Tagged ‘International forces in Afghanistan’

The corrupt government, huge amounts of aid misused by a particular section of people, and the presence of foreign forces have all together contributed to the doubling of the miseries of the common Afghan.

Prices of basic items have soared up and are still on the rise, ratio of unemployment is going higher and higher, and the real income level is going down. For example, during the Taliban era, one loaf of bread was sold for 3 Afghanis, now its price has doubled. One liter of petrol was sold for 11 Afghanis, now it is over 50 Afghanis. Similarly, one kilogram of liquefied gas was sold for 20 Afghanis, but now it is over 60 Afghanis. Prices have increased manifold, but the income of the common man has dropped.

Residents of Kabul enjoyed at least 12 hours electricity six years ago, but now it decreased to four hours. Kabul is perhaps the only capital in the world living in blackout. The roads of the heart of the capital have not been asphalted, but they have further damaged. This is the case in the capital, Kabul, which is often depicted as a success story of the post-Taliban Afghanistan. The situation is far worse in the countryside and the provinces.

Poverty and deterioration of daily life is not the only fact contributing to the common Afghan’s increasing disappointment and lose of trust in the government. One other reason that make people turn against the incumbent regime is that its ‘international friends’, a term used here for the occupying forces, are relentlessly turning against the civilians.

In such a situation, the international community must not be taken by surprise if overwhelming number of Afghans are joining Taliban or becoming members of the suicide squads of al-Qaeda. The phenomenon of suicide bombing is alien to this proud nation, but they deem it fit to cut off the link between their body and soul at once instead of dying in bits.

 (Source: Bourhan Younous, ION, 2/8/08)

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